From a mother’s perspective

One of the trending topics in the Philippines and popular among Filipinos around the world is #JusticeForKian.  Kian is the 17-year-old student killed by the police during the “one time, big time” operation against illegal drugs in the Philippines.  Still a part of President Rodrigo Duterte’s war on drugs.  What makes Kian stand out though, among the more than 80 people killed in just four days, is the fact that the police sang their usual tune of “nanlaban” while the footage from the barangay CCTV told a different story. An additional flavor to the story is about the OFW mother who works as a domestic helper in the Middle East. Now in the Philippines to mourn for her son, she demands justice. Of course. And whether she gets it is another story. As a mother myself, I feel the pain. No parent wants to bury her own son. And the pain that dreams have been snuffed out because of his

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Stooping down to the level of the Parojinogs

Yes, that’s what this government has done. That’s my personal opinion, of course. Though not yet proven in court, it is already a general and a common knowledge that the Parojinogs in Ozamis City are into a number of illegal activities, including the distribution of illegal drugs not just in Ozamis but also beyond.  Since, politically, the Parojinogs control the city, they were basically “untouchables.” Plus, the rumors that police and military officials are into the Parojinogs’ payroll. I have been to Ozamis a number of times because my husband is from Misamis Occidental.  I like the city, in fact, from my experience, it is nothing like the descriptions made by some after the raid by the police into the Parojinog properties.  I think, though, that the Parojinog properties have become some kind of a tourist attraction, that when you visit Ozamis, somebody will always tell you or show you, although from afar, that that’s the Parojinogs. Actually, what I

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Standing up for my family

It is still about my love for my country, still about my loyalty to the Philippine flag.  I just have to open my eyes, that from where I am, I can’t fight the tide.  “Don’t cross the river if you can’t swim the tide.”  I remember this line from the song by America.  It may not be in the same context but yes, why cross the river if you can’t swim? If you insist, then you will be courting trouble. Anyway, that’s how I describe the current events in the Philippines.  First, I told myself, yes, we should not keep silent lest the negative things that’s happening in the country will continue.  And then there was the fear for my family back home, how I can protect them and how can they protect themselves – they are young and they may not even understand fully what’s happening around them.  And then there’s life’s principles based on the very teachings that

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Soar, wounded as you may be

Just today morning, I saw a post on Facebook that says, “Life is short. Cut out the negativity, forget gossip, say goodbye to people who hurt you.  Spend your days with people who are always there.” That statement is very simple, if it refers only to friends, acquaintances, colleagues, neighbors, enemies or just anybody.  In others words, saying goodbye to non-members of your family is easier, yes it hurts, but easier.  Easier to burn friendly bridges turned bridges of sigh although yeah, bridges of sigh can be relevant and attractive. From the way my Mama raised me and the values I’ve learned from her, goodbye should’t be apart of the family’s dictionary. “So long” yes, but not goodbye.  Family is family is family is family. A description of family not being always about blood, is gaining popularity.  The employees of a company is considered belonging to a family.  Overseas Filipino Workers (OFW) for example, become parts of a family not

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One year on – where are we heading?

I grabbed this picture from Reuters online, from the item entitled “Dead on Arrival Philippine Police use hospitals to hide drug war killings” published just today, 29th June 2017 ( http://www.reuters.com/investigates/special-report/philippines-duterta-doa/ ).   I have actually decided to discipline myself and stop making comments on what is happening in the Philippines. I was told once to stay out of any of the discussions because I was told I am out of the country anyway.  I took it as telling me what’s happening in my country is none of my business. I remembered I rolled my eyes and told myself in disbelief, “Really?” I still make short comments online some of the times, but mostly, I don’t watch, I don’t read. But I am sad, very sad. And I hope I am wrong, just wrong in what I see, how I see things and how I interpret what’s happening. I used to be very interested in my country’s current events, sift

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I love the Philippines, too

Writing about the Philippines these days has the danger of you being called pretentious, a hypocrite, nagmamagaling, hindi naka move on (as in falling out of love?) just to name a few.  It is easy to brush these off, but it hurts. It hurts because I care. Anyway, I don’t want to be silent, I don’t want to keep silent.  Even if it seems like I am a small voice in the wilderness. And in doing so I am able to convince one soul, even just one soul, then I can confidently face my God and say, “I did what I had to do.” I am with everybody and anybody who wants a peaceful and progressive Philippines. I am with you who want a drug-free, crime-free, corruption-free Philippines. I am with you who support a leadership with an iron fist, a leadership with a political will to clean up the mess that the previous administrations left. I am with you

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